Organic Chemical Free Gardening

Each year there are thousands upon thousands of gallons of chemicals being poured into the environment. Why? Many gardeners and farmers are using toxic chemicals in their garden. The chemicals leech into the produce that we ingest. Rain washes the chemicals from the vegetables and into the ground. There are many ways these chemicals get there, but the point is it can be prevented.

organic garden

Use these ideas to make the switch from chemicals to chemical-free gardening and start doing your part to prevent these chemicals from destroying our Earth.

You don’t need pesticides if there are no pests.

Many plants have their own defense systems when it comes to warding off would-be predators. They naturally produce chemicals that ward off animals. Some of these plants include

  • basil – repels flies and mosquitos
  • garlic – repels rabbits
  • catnip – repels ants, cockroaches, beetles, and aphids
  • oregano – repels most pests
  • rosemary – repels slugs and snails

Plant any of these in and around your garden to cut back the need for pesticides. You can also use these in recipes and DIY projects.

crops

If you’d rather not have these crops growing in your garden you can use natural sprays of vanilla, lavender, and/or hot pepper on your plants.

Reach in and pull out the weeds.

Weedkiller is a temptation for many gardeners. It’s definitely much easier to spray it on than to pull each individual weed but easier is rarely better. If you do regular check and pulls then it wouldn’t take much time to keep your garden weed-free. Pull them when you see them and you’re done. The fresh air will help you in the long run.

garden in need of weeding

If you’re feeling particularly lazy you can make a DIY natural weedkiller using Borax powder and water. Mix 10 ounces of borax powder with 2.5 gallons of water and spray only on weeds and plants you want to kill. Avoid overspray as this can harm your wanted plants along with the weeds and you don’t want this stuff seeping into the soil.

Switch ’em, Change ’em, Rearrange ’em

Mass producing farmers and home gardeners alike are using crop rotation to naturally fertilize plants. The concept is to change what crop you’re planting in a certain plot each year. Plants use different nutrients and put other nutrients back into the soil. If you rotate crops that replace the nutrients the other plants use, you will have to fertilize the soil less.

You can use this concept by planting different plants every year, or just rotating where you put specific plants in the garden. Here are a few ideas for starting your crop rotation.

sample crop rotation schedule

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